Soldier Tries to Buy Cigarettes, When He Produced his Military ID the Unthinkable Happened

CollinBrown

Collin Brown serves as an Army reservist in Washington State. On Wednesday of last week, he went to the 7-Eleven in Redmond, Washington to buy a slurpee and decided to pick up a pack of cigarettes for his fiancee. When asked for his ID to purchase the cigarettes, Brown pulled out his military ID, which is a valid form of identification. The clerk asked him, “Are you in the military?” When Brown responded yes, the clerk’s response was both shocking and insulting.

According to Brown, after he confirmed that he is indeed in the military, the clerk said, “Then, I can’t serve you.” He spoke to KIRO-TV about his experience and said, “And honestly, I was at that point in shock. I asked, ‘Are you serious?’ She looked at me like she was offended.”

He was able to finally complete his transaction, but only, he says, after he asked for the manager’s information.

Brown’s friends and family were irate when they heard about his allegations regarding the 7-Eleven clerk and expressed their outrage on social media. According to The Blaze, as of Thursday afternoon, over 12,000 people had spread the news of what happened to military posts around the country.

The local owner of this particular 7-Eleven did not initially comment when asked about the situation by the news station. The owner did finally send a statement on Thursday.

“We sincerely apologize for a misunderstanding that occurred at one of our stores.  A customer presented a military ID as a form of identification and the store associate could not clearly read the birth date.  In this instance, the store associate, by law, asked to see a second form of ID.  After the customers age was verified the transaction was complete.”

7-Eleven corporate, located in Dallas, did reply after receiving complaints on their social media. The company said, ”A customer presented a military ID as a form of identification and the store associate could not clearly read the birth date. In this instance, the store associate, by law, asked to see a second form of ID.”

Later, the company sent a more detailed statement.

“It’s clear that a misunderstanding occurred at a franchised 7-Eleven store. We understand that a customer presented a military ID as a form of identification when buying age-restricted products, and the Franchisee’s store associate could not clearly read the birth date. In this instance, the store associate, by law, was required to ask to see a second form of ID with a birthdate. After the customer’s age was verified, the transaction was completed. Serving members of the military, being named a top military-friendly company and employing military veterans are great honors for 7-Eleven.”

However, if you look at the back of Brown’s military ID, his date of birth is in bold black lettering and very easy to see.

Brown stands by his recounting of what happened. He said, “From moment one, the only thing I was hoping to do by coming forward with this is to get the issue addressed with the employee. If you don’t know something is wrong, you can’t fix it.”

Before making the decision to come forward with his story, Brown cleared it with his commanding officer as well as discussed it with his family. They all encouraged him to share his story because they believed it needed to be told.

What do you think? Should the 7-Eleven franchise hire more military friendly employees?

h/t:  The Blaze

About the Author

Jennifer Burke
Jennifer Burke
Jennifer is a Co-Founder of PolitiStick and the Editor-in-Chief. She is a graduate of Texas A&M University and a certified teacher with 12 years experience in the classroom. Jennifer attended what is credited for being the first modern-day Tea Party rally in the country in the Seattle area and from there emerged as a powerful speaker and writer within the movement. While still in Washington State, Jennifer was selected to be a member of the second graduating class of the Jennifer Dunn Leadership Institute (JDLI), a program which identified future conservative leaders. Jennifer worked as the National Outreach Director for one of the largest conservative groups in the country and served as Managing Editor and writer for what quickly grew to become one of the top 15 conservative sites in the country. She brings to Politistick a passion for the fight for freedom for current and future generations.
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